Scicli: the 5 places not to be missed - PURA VIDA BAROCCA

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Scicli: the 5 places not to be missed

1 - Church of San Bartolomeo
The Church of San Bartolomeo of Scicli is a monument that deserves a visit. It dates back to the early fifteenth century, and was largely resisted by the earthquake of 1693. In its current structure, the building has clear late-baroque influences, while the columns trabeated by the Palladian rigor that end in the mighty ribs of the dome suggest a neoclassical influence. The façade was designed by Salvatore Alì, a Syracusan architect, combining late-baroque plasticity with neoclassical rationality. Inside the church has a single nave, it is preceded by an esonartece and is closed by a rather deep rectangular apse. Two chapels on the sides form a sort of transept. The church boasts decorations in partially gilded stucco (built between the first half of the eighteenth century until 1864) which are one of the most successful examples of the baroque and rocaille in Sicily. The vault is frescoed with scenes from the life of Saint Bartholomew, and the large altarpiece depicts the Martyrdom, created by Francesco Pascucci. Finally, of great value is the wooden crib of 1573 attributed to Pietro Padula.
Chiesa di San Bartolomeo

2 – Beneventano Palace
Following the road that leads from Modica towards Scicli, we come across one of the jewels of this complex art: Beneventano Palace, considered the highest expression of Sicilian Baroque, thanks to the bizarre and composite effect that this structure communicates to those who He admires. Built at the beginning of the eighteenth century, on the slopes of the San Matteo hill, Palazzo Beneventano was built immediately after the earthquake that, in 1693, devastated Sicily. Today, the palace is part of the sites declared World Heritage by UNESCO. But what has pushed UNESCO to consider this architectural marvel of World Heritage? What strikes the spectator at first glance is the grotesque and showy decorations that dominate the balconies. Each balcony is supported by corbels depicting fantastic animals and anthropomorphic masks. Thanks to the curved wrought iron curls, the balconies dominate the scene, creating interesting games of light that enliven the whole structure. Worthy of interest are the dark brown heads that surround the emblem of the Beneventano family and the representation of St. Joseph below. The masks, the expressive decorations and the corbels seem to follow a narrative vein that refers to the raids of the Saracens and pirates of the Mediterranean and their subsequent capture. In order to represent the cruelty of these events, most of the sculptures have aggressive expressions, almost scary, just to want to tell those who observe them the fear of those moments. The faint colors of the facade, which contrast with the dark color of wrought iron, make this construction light, elegant, sophisticated and at the same time bizarre and fantastic.
Palazzo Beneventano

3 - Church of San Giovanni
The Church of San Giovanni Evangelista is one of the main places to see in Scicli. The church was built between 1760 and 1765 on a project by the Carmelite architect and friar Alberto Maria of San Giovanni Battista, and decorated with stuccoes by Giovanni Gianforma, who also created the fresco on the vault. Further interior decorations, stuccos and gilding, were made in 1854. The current architectural structure is the result of reconstructions that took place between the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. The façade presents itself as a concave-convex with three orders, with Borrominian influences. The first order is marked by Ionic columns, among which the entrance portal opens, while the second order is followed by a wrought iron jealousy in nineteenth-century style. The interior of the church has an oval plan, surmounted by a dome with large windows. The apse is connected to the wide oval hall through a triumphal arch of theatrical taste, typical of the Baroque. Inside the church you can admire a precious pipe organ made by Salvatore Andronico Battaglia in 1841. Finally, in the sacristy, there is a seventeenth century painting depicting the "Christ of Burgos" of Spanish origin.
Chiesa di San Giovanni

4 – Spadaro Palace
The building belonged to the Spadaro family, of Modica origin moved to Scicli in the seventeenth century, was built several times during the 1700s. It is one of the institutional headquarters of the Municipality. It represents the tangible proof of the progressive change of taste from the pompous and scenographic late Baroque poetry to a refined and refined rococo culture. The façade is slightly curved and follows the still medieval layout of the ancient Corso (via Francesco Mormino Penna). The interiors, both architecturally and purely decorative, refer to nineteenth-century remodeling. Visitable, home to numerous temporary exhibitions.
Palazzo Spadaro

5 - Church of Santa Teresa
The church was annexed under the title of St. Clare to the former monastery of St. Teresa, founded in 1660 by the Discalced Carmelites, in which, in 1673, the cloister was established. Raso to the ground from the earthquake of 1693, the monastery was rebuilt between 1715 and 1719 by the master builder Giuseppe Puccia. The church remained open to worship until 1950, only around 1960 the Bishop of Noto ceded it to the Municipality, which, after having made some restoration, has made this space available to welcome cultural and social initiatives. Currently the Monastery has been transformed into private homes.
Chiesa di Santa Teresa
PURA VIDA BAROCCA di Guastella Alessia
Via Ciullo d'Alcamo n° 56, 97100 Ragusa (Sicilia)
P.I.: 01677330886
PURA VIDA BAROCCA di Guastella Alessia
Via Ciullo d'Alcamo n° 56, 97100 Ragusa (Sicilia)
P.I.: 01677330886
PURA VIDA BAROCCA di Guastella Alessia
Via Ciullo d'Alcamo n° 56, 97100 Ragusa (Sicilia)
P.I.: 01677330886
PURA VIDA BAROCCA di Guastella Alessia
Via Ciullo d'Alcamo n° 56, 97100 Ragusa (Sicilia)
PURA VIDA IBLEA di Guastella Alessia
Chiasso La Cetra n° 6 - 7, 97100 Ragusa Ibla (Sicilia)
P.I.: 01677330886

PURA VIDA IBLEA di Guastella Alessia
Chiasso La Cetra n° 6 - 7, 97100 Ragusa Ibla (Sicilia)
P.I.: 01677330886
PURA VIDA IBLEA di Guastella Alessia
Chiasso La Cetra, n° 6 - 7, 97100 Ragusa Ibla (Sicilia)
P.I.: 01677330886
PURA VIDA IBLEA di Guastella Alessia
Chiasso La Cetra,  n° 6 - 7, 97100 Ragusa Ibla (Sicilia)
P.I.: 01677330886
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